Why Education Aren’t As Bad As You Think

Tips for Military Spouses Who Want to Go Back to School

As a military spouse, expanding your education can be beneficial to your family in plenty of ways. Financially, it can surely enhance your earning power and help fetch career opportunities. Personally, getting a higher education can bring a feeling of fulfillment that lets you feel more confident about yourself and your future. Below are tips for your consideration:

Think about your general personal and career goals.

Concentrate on something that is personally and professionally interesting to you. Build a career that offers desirable pay, a stable work-life balance, and overall satisfaction.

Get to know the job market in the field you’ve chosen.

Will there be attractive and readily available opportunities for you? Moreover, are there particular parts of the country where this field is not as lucrative? If job opportunities are limited, it may not be worth your time and money to get a degree or certification.

Use applicable financial assistance or military spouse scholarship programs.

There are several programs that can help military spouses deal with the costs of education. For example, the Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA)will be able to cover a maximum of $4000 worth of costs if you’re aiming for an associate degree, credential or license. A lot of state colleges and universities apply in-state tuition rates, regardless of residence duration. As well, plenty of army spouse training scholarship programs that use different methods of financial aid, including low-interest federal loans. All branches of the military also extend financial assistance to U.S.-residing spouses with husbands stationed overseas.

Look into online education for military spouses.

Since military families are always relocating, finishing local education programs is sometimes a challenge. Online Portable Career Training Programs offer flexibility that military families can surely benefit from.

Appeal your transfer credits.

If you have credits from your previous college and your prospective military spouse school refuses to accept them, don’t hesitate to challenge their decision. Schools generally have a process for this, and your advisor or counselor must be able to extend assistance. A course description, syllabus and other information is usually requested. Efforts are typically successful as you provide more details for those grades you have earned. If you are unsuccessful, check with other schools whose accreditation or curriculum might be more aligned, and which may have transfer agreements as in the case of junior colleges with local universities.

Observe good timing.

Having to juggle a family and work while performing the responsibilities of a student can be quite overwhelming. Be sure to plan everything smoothly so you don’t have to compromise any of these areas.